News from the World

Top News

  • Universal Children's Day

    20 November

    Nearly 25 years ago, the world made a promise to children: that we would do everything in our power to protect and promote their rights to survive and thrive, to learn and grow, to make their voices heard and to reach their full potential. In spite of the overall gains, there are many children who have fallen even further behind. Old challenges have combined with new problems to deprive many children of their rights and the benefits of development.

    To meet these challenges, and to reach those children who are hardest to reach, we need new ways of thinking and new ways of doing - for adults and children.

    There is much to celebrate as we mark the 25th anniversary of the Convention, from

  • Aleteo # 127

    15 years together in the conservation Festivals

    8 Threatened Parrots Festivals, Migratory Birds & the Jaguar join the community in activities that promote and make visible the ongoing efforts to protect endangered species in Colombia.

     

    Read more...

     

    Anorí, a municipality committed to the conservation of its natural wealth

    ProAves participates in the Anorí Municipal Environmental Bureau, a process led by Corantioquia, where different activities are socialized, debated and coordinated, in partnership with the community and in the Environment's benefit.

     

    Read more...

     

    Recovering The Tángaras Reserve forests

    Since February 2014 nursery and reforestation activities have been developed in the Tangaras Bird Reserve, a nursery of 200m2 and an annual production of 15,000 seedlings of 12 different species, it is expected that 2014 will finish with 46 acres reforested.

    Read more...

  • AZE: The performance and potential of protected areas

    Here is a publication, made by James E. M. Watson, Nigel Dudley, Daniel B. Segan & Marc Hockings, featuring AZE regarding the increase in protected areas and decrease in effective management.

    You can download the entire publication by clicking on the link below:

    Link

  • Generation Awakening Newsletter November 2014

    Celebrities show support for our awareness campaign to keep America's horses WILD & FREE

    We need your voice too! Share Generation Awakening campaign on social media & sign our Change.org petition by clicking here

    The Bureau of Land Management is using helicopters to round up wild horses and force them into government holding facilities. Elderly horses and calves are often injured and sometimes die in these exhausting and terrifying roundups.  Once in these facilities, they can be subject to auction. There are numerous reports of wild horses being sold to "middlemen" who then sell them to kill-buyers for slaughter. 

    For those who don't lose their lives, they have still lost everything else: freedom family and home.

    Most recent reports indicate that the roundups and the 50,000 wild horses currently in government holding facilities cost tax-payers $80 million annually. Americans are paying for privately owned livestock to graze on federal lands instead of wild horses.

  • Saving women and girls from danger in refugee camps; the Darfur Women Network supplies safe stoves to women

    After escaping violence at home, women and girls in refugee camps face many dangers such as violence, hunger, displacement and looting. On top of this when they venture far away in search of firewood or water, they also risk rape, assault, abduction, beating and death.

    Firewood is the main reason for these dangerous excursions out of camps near Touloum, Chad. As the conflict in Darfur, Sudan continues, more refugees arrive with few if any resources from home. They rely on aid organizations and donations to survive, but cooking food usually requires collecting wood far from their new homes. As more people arrive and more trees are cut down close to the camp there is less wood for each individual along with the added problem of deforestation. The cutting of so many trees has caused erosion and also creates conflict with locals who rely on the forest for their own survival.

    The Darfur Women Network(DWN) is stepping in with fuel-efficient stoves and a reforestation plan to support the refugees. On August 25, 2014 they distributed 202 stoves to women in the camp. Many women showed up to receive a stove and witness the occasion dressed in their colorful, cleaned clothes. There was a  huge celebration and much appreciation.

  • Save The Frogs Event and Upcoming Fun

    November 6th, 2014: Berkeley, CA
    SAVE THE FROGS! Art Show at the SAVE THE FROGS! Education Center6pm-9pm

    You are invited to the one of a kind SAVE THE FROGS! Art Show, which will feature over 250 pieces of the greatest frog art ever created! The Art Show will take place at the SAVE THE FROGS! Education Center on November 6th, 2014 from 6pm-9pm. We will be displaying and auctioning off amazing frog art from around the world to raise funds for our amphibian conservation efforts. Most of the art was submitted to us through our SAVE THE FROGS! Art Contest, which between 2009 and 2013 received 9,336 frog art entries from 66 countries. What you'll be seeing is the best of the best! This event will be fun and educational, so please bring some friends and help us out by spreading the word. And please support our work by buying your favorite piece of frog art at the event! The SAVE THE FROGS! Education Center is located at 2524 San Pablo Ave. (corner of Dwight Way next to the Ecology Center), Berkeley, CA 94702.

  • Call for project proposals - UN Democracy Fund

    The United Nations Democracy Fund invites civil society organizations to apply for funding for projects to advance and support democracy. Project proposals may be submitted on-line between 15 November 2014 and  31 December 2014 at www.un.org/democracyfund. You can find guidelines, FAQs and lessons learned from previous rounds at http://www.un.org/democracyfund/application-materials. Those who plan to apply are strongly encouraged to visit this page as soon as possible to familiarize yourself with what is required. Only on-line applications in either English or French will be accepted.  UNDEF supports projects that strengthen the voice of civil society, promote human rights, and encourage the participation of all groups in democratic processes. The large majority of UNDEF funds go to local civil society organizations -- both in the transition and consolidation phases of democratization. In this way, UNDEF plays a novel and distinct role in complementing the UN's other work -- the work with Governments -- to strengthen  democratic governance around the world.
  • NewsStream – Four Films You've Got to See

    Often times, seeing is believing. Pictures don't always capture the roaring power of a free flowing river or the voices of those who are standing up in defense of the river they rely on for daily life. That's why this month's NewsStream features four short films that expose some of the latest struggles and victories in the movement to protect our world's rivers. Through these videos you'll travel to three of the places we work – the Teesta River in India, the largest desert lake in Kenya, and the sacred Areng Valley in Cambodia. The fourth film takes place in the tropical highlands in Fiji, and although we don't work there, their success story of river protection is too inspiring not to share. With incredible cinematography, these personal stories and dramatic landscapes remind us why it's so critically urgent to stand with International Rivers and our partners around the world.

    Protecting the Teesta River

    Flowing through the length of the Indian state of Sikkim, the Teesta River is considered the lifeline of the region with its rich biodiversity and the livelihoods it supports. Today, the Teesta River has become a